Faye Viviana began dancing at the age of 5 under the tutelage of Karen Alwin. At the age of 15 she moved to New York as a scholarship student at the Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School at American Ballet Theatre. In 2006, at the age of 16, she was offered a highly coveted contract with American Ballet Theatre's Studio Company. Dancing for ABT had been a dream of Fayes since she was a little girl and now that dream was coming true. Through her dancing career she studied under world renowned ballet masters such as Luis Fuente, Alonzo King, Kevin McKenzie, John Meehan, Franco De Vita, Susan Jaffe, Martine van Hamel, Gelsey Kirkland, Ethan Stiefel, Yuri Fateev, and many others.

In 2007 Faye fell during a rehearsal, tearing almost all tendons in her left knee. It was a career ending injury. After two years of grueling rehab and surgery, doctors told her she would never be able to dance again. Everything changed for Faye; "I'd describe it like losing your native language. I felt as though I had lost my ability to speak. Dance was my home, my first love, my therapy and suddenly I couldn't do it anymore. Like everything I knew about who I was, my identity, what I had to say as an artist, was taken away from me. In an instant.". Faye was devastated and was forced to abandon her one true passion; "I loved ballet so much. I felt like if I couldn't dance at the level I knew I was capable of, I didn't want to dance at all.".

Since the accident Faye decided to turn her attention to teaching & acting and has appeared on such shows as Longmire (A&E), Castle (ABC) and Sullivan & Sons (TBS). But in 2015 something unexpected happened. After seeing footage of Faye dance while looking for a potential dancer/actor for his debut music video "Feel It", Yelpy's manager Ieva Georges contacted Faye and asked her to dance once again. It was a terrifying request but Faye agreed; "When Yelpy asked me to dance in his video, I don't really know why I said yes. But I did. Not because I didn't want to, but I wasn't sure if I could really do it. I immediately started working in the studio. I spent at least three nights a week by myself just trying to get through barre. I don't think I got through an entire barre for almost three months!".

In preparing for the video shoot Faye needed to come to terms with her body's limitations; "Someone telling you that your leg will never be the same and actually accepting the reality of what those words mean is a completely different experience. Your brain knows how things used to feel, how impulses would translate into movement, etc. and suddenly it feels like you are trying to sing with rocks in your mouth and you keep choking where it used to work with ease. Not to mention just the overall fitness level!". Physically Faye could not train the amount of hours she used to. She had to learn to accept her new self, her new limitations. She had to learn to overcome her fears, her frustration and leave it all behind. Faye was not dancing in contest with her former self, this was something different, something pure, this was emotion. Faye needed to just let go and feel it, let the music move her body; "Talk about learning to accept yourself! It was a challenge to look in the mirror and not just hate every aspect of myself. But I had to get over it. It was really good for me. I didn't realize how much of that baggage and judgment I had been carrying around all this time.".

Witness first hand as Faye's courage, determination and her unflinching love for her art sees her dance once again in Yelpy's "Feel It".
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